Rob Bravery – strange, piano-led pop (From the Charlie Williams seed)

Rob Bravery

The first track I heard on Rob Bravery’s MySpace was “Hedonistic Graveyard”, and it was a particularly exciting moment in the project because I could hear how we got here from the original seed (the path:  Charlie Williams –> Four Quartets –> Rob Bravery)…he has the instrumental delight of Mira Mira, with a touch of Sharples’ low-key delivery.  I actually followed my ears to the connection.  Awesome.

How did you get started playing music?

I picked up a few power chords on the guitar with the sole purpose of joining my older brother’s metal band Mongolian Clusterfuck (I was 14). Eventually I started teaching myself piano, which is now my main instrument.

What was the first recording you ever purchased?

Siamese Dream (Smashing Pumpkins) – Still in my top ten

How would you describe the music you play now?

I suppose strange, piano-led pop. Tough question, I like interesting chord progressions, lyrics etc.

You are a multi-instrumentalist – is there any particular instrument you love best? Or one that you wish you could play?

My favourite to play would be the drums, at least for the first 10 minutes. After that I’m physically incapable. I wish I could play the spoons like my dad.

Who would you consider your musical inspiration?

Elliott Smith, Tom Waits, Joanna Newsom, Stephen Malkmus (there are loads more).

If you could pick a perfect lineup (dead or alive) for a show where you were the headliner, who would it be?

Aside from the above, I’d have Rufus Wainwright, Neil Young, possibly my old man on watering can. RATM. All the greats.

what attracts you to a particular song? An artist?

Initially tasteful lyrics ie. not ‘my life is brilliant..’ In most cases thoughtful chordal and melodic developments.

Who is one person I should be listening to right this very moment? Why does their work get you excited?

I’m a big fan of Four Quartets (Rob Sharples’s new project). He’s a great songwriter. I’m also eagerly awaiting the respective forthcoming releases of Joanna Newsom and Dr Dog.

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Take a listen:

Rob Bravery – “Hedonistic Graveyard”

Rob Bravery – “Cobweb Song”

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Charlie Williams Four QuartetsRob Bravery

Caithlin De Marrais – A soft slap of sweet singing…(From the Ben Arthur Seed)

Caithlin De Marrais

We’re starting to get into the third round of the Ear to Ear Project, so let’s review…

Ben Arthur pointed to Balthrop, Alabama, who offered Caithlin De Marrais, a songwriter with a delightful twang and deep sense of place.  I’ve fallen for her well-crafted lo-fi-ness (not something I normally say), where everything sounds real and present and unaltered, and oh-so-true.

So let’s meet Caithlin…

How did you get started playing music?

My band, Rainer Maria, recorded and toured from ’95-’06. I was on bass/vocals, Kyle Fischer–guitars/vocals, Bill Kuehn–drums. In the film “The Wrestler” Randy the Ram says that the ’90s sucked, but I thought it was an ok time to be in a band. The music industry hadn’t imploded yet and there was an “us against them” camaraderie between us indie bands. I always wore my heart on my sleeve when I played.

What was the first recording you ever purchased?

My awesome little brother and I would go to the Trumbull mall and buy 45s. We collected dozens and dozens–everything from big hits to obscure gems–Prince, Peter Gabriel, Bow Wow Wow, A-Ha, Eddie Grant, Nena, Musical Youth, Van Halen…much dancing and head banging in the living room ensued.

How would you describe the music you play now?

“Like a soft slap to the face.” (thanks Pitchfork!)

What instruments do you all play in your band?  How did you pick that combination?

Josh Kaufman is my wingman on electric guitar. I have two excellent drummers, Jason Lawrence and Konrad Meissner. Many other wonderful musicians make appearances on My Magic City, including one of my most cherished guitar heroes, Dean Wareham, and his gorgeous bandmate, Britta Phillips.
Somehow along the way I discovered how fun it was to record and play music with my mad, brilliant friends.

Is there a comparison you would make between your music and something non-musical?  A painter, building, dish of cereal?

My Magic City has a golden honeycomb center surrounded by delicious milk chocolate, just like a Cadbury Crunchie bar.

Who would you consider your musical inspiration?

For My Magic City I was ruminating on my love of Spacemen 3, Spiritualized and Galaxie 500.

If you could pick a perfect lineup (dead or alive) for a show where you were the headliner, who would it be?

The kid in me wants to go back to the ’70s when Stevie Wonder performed “Superstition” live on Sesame Street. That was cool. But since I don’t have a time machine, I’d like to reform The Smiths and open for them. All I need is 3 million dollars or so.

What attracts you to a particular song? An artist?

Dance-ability! Or alternately, heartbreak-ability.

Who should I be listening to right this very moment? Why does their work get you excited?

Best two new releases I’m listening to right now: El May. Her amazing self-titled debut album is out Jan 19th. And Owen. His latest album New Leaves is a gem.
Best two Pandora stations I’m listening to right now: Roxy Music Radio. And Julie London Radio.

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Listen to Caithlin:

Caithlin De Marrais – “Outer Space Is Still Sexy” (features Dean Wareham on electric guitar)

Caithlin De Marrais – “Play Fair” (Cover of Bob Buckridge tune)

And pick up a disc!

Caithlin De Marais - My Magic City

A note from Caithlin:

My latest record, Seb & Cait Live at Joe’s will be released on End Up Records in Feb.  It’s a live recording of a show at Joe’s Pub in NYC, I played with the artist, Seb Leon. Also check out Seb’s record, Cranes of Glitter. It’s like a French souffle with Bowie and Roxy Music inclinations.
http://www.sebleon.info/

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Ben Arthur (seed) → Balthrop, AlabamaCaithlin De Marrais

The Seedy Seeds – Piles of Instrument Fun Seed

Photo by Scott Beseler of www.taketheday.com

The Seedy Seeds don’t know you, but they already like you.

And you will like them too – I certainly did, after hearing their 2006 demo, and particularly “Earned Average Dance America,” (check out the track below, and see my essay for Song of the Day).  It is a captivating combination  of instrumental creativity and quirky lyrics.  Margaret was kind enough to shed some light on her inner workings, creative process, and crayons.

Tell us a little about yourself…

My name is Margaret. I’m a transplant to Cincinnati—I grew up in Virginia. I like to think a lot. I also really like to cook.

How did you get started playing music?

My parents put me in piano lessons when I was maybe 6 or so… it didn’t last particularly long. Then, about five or six years later, when my older brother got a guitar, I’d sneak into his room when he was away and try and figure things out anxiously before anyone could catch me doing it. I’d make what I thought were really “progressive” and “experimental” tape recordings using my dad’s voice recorder. I bought my own guitar when I was 13 and started writing a lot of terrible music privately in my room.

What was the first recording you ever purchased?


Not sure I can remember… with my own money? Probably “The Sign” by Ace of Base. It’s the album that had all the jams… I wouldn’t share it with my little sister so she bought her own copy. Our home was rich with Ace of Base.

What do you think “indie” really means in terms of music? Is it an aesthetic, a culture, a state of being without cash?
When I first started going to shows, I had the impression that “indie” was a movement like any other, something that had come necessarily out of and in reaction to another movement. To me, “Indie” was an alternative to “alternative” rock radio. It definitely encompassed a particular sound, perhaps a sound mood, too. I remember when bands previously unknown to most of the people I knew suddenly became more accessible, and these sounds and sound moods excited a broader audience with their seeming newness, “indie” kind of expanded to encompass a lot more. Because it really stands to identify music produced by unsigned bands or bands who are not signed to major labels, “indie” now describes more sounds and styles of music than I’d previously given credit to. And to limit the term only to aesthetics would, I think, be unfair. It is most certainly a culture also.

By not elaborating on this last point I hope it doesn’t seem hastily or lazily tacked on… just seemed like this answer was already starting to resemble the introduction to a boring book by me that will be read by only me.

Of all the instruments you play, which is your favorite?  Do any of them have names?

Autoharp. Definitely autoharp. I so far haven’t named any of my instruments, but I have named my utility knife. I call it Peggy Sue.

When you’re writing a song, which comes first – the music of the lyrics?

I’ve written both ways. Sometimes lyrics and music come simultaneously. I write when I’m feeling inspired and so I can’t rely upon a formula—I’m not talented enough… when I’m itching to create something I just kind of explore… it’s organic I suppose. So sometimes I’ve got an idea I want to write into words and sometimes I just want to pick something up and hum to it and see if anything of interest comes out.

Who would you consider your musical inspiration?

Musical inspiration? It’s kind of complicated. Music inspires me to do things other than write, record and perform music, while things that are not musical inspire me to write, record and perform music. So, now I need to figure out whether you want most to know what music inspires me to do things non-musical or what non-musical thing inspires me to be musical… To keep it limited, I’d say my biggest musical inspiration on non-musical activities is Four Tet. And I’m most inspired by my friends and family to create music.

Is there a comparison you would make between your music and something non-musical?  A painter, building, dish of cereal?

Never really considered that before… perhaps one of those crayons that are like 4 colors in one and make a rainbowesque streak when you draw with the broad side, and a mess of mixed colors when you scribble.

If you could pick a perfect lineup of bands (dead or alive) for a show where The Seedy Seeds was the headliner, who would it be?

Oh my, oh my. There are so many ridiculously amazing bands that I would consider doing desperate things to share the stage with… but I have to say, if you didn’t know already, Cincinnati is brimming with some serious musical talent right now… and there’s nothing at all quite like playing a show with amazing bands that are also amazing friends. Right now I’d say the perfect bill for a show we’d be headlining would be: The Seedy Seeds / You, You’re Awesome / The Sheds.

What attracts you to a particular song? An artist?

It usually depends on the genre… I’m for sure captivated by melody and harmonies. I’m also very serious about lyrics—words I don’t like can ruin a song for me, and there are definitely entire catalogs by bands that I won’t touch on account of my lyrics pickiness. When I’m listening to electronic music or more minimalist music, I really like dynamism and balance. And more and more lately I’ve been really obsessed with production quality. To add to the list, I’m also kind of obsessed with mood in music. I love song elements that give me an overwhelming sense of a place, idea, feeling, or other noun, adjective or verb.

Which one person/band should I be listening to right this very moment? Why does their work get you excited?

You should be listening to Bro. Stephen. It’s the project of my friend Scott Kirkpatrick and it’s amazing. His delivery is beautiful. His lyrics are provocative and clever, and the way he chooses to word things makes me feel richer for knowing someone who interprets things so differently from me, but shares these thoughts in an easy to understand manner. Scott has a great sense of dynamic in his presentation and his songs are performed with this intense conviction that always manages to elicit real loyal devotion from my ears. To top it all off, Bro. Stephen practically sets the example for music that evokes mood. His songs really sound like sitting in a cozy, dark room at night lit only with colored lights in the middle of December when it’s still and quiet. Amazing!

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Listen to some of The Seedy Seeds!

The Seedy Seeds – Change States – “Earned Average Dance America”

The Seedy Seeds – Count the Days – “Dandelion”

and buy a disc, while you’re at it!